18th Century Woman of The Decorative Arts

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Widowed at the age of 51, Hester Bateman (1709-1794) inherited her husband's small metalwork business. Registering her first mark with the London Goldsmiths Company in 1761 at the age 52, with the aid of her two sons, Peter and Jonathan, Jonathan’s wife, Ann, Hester built the workshop into a renowned and thriving silver manufacturing firm. For the next 30 years, Hester became the most celebrated 18th century English female silversmith in an industry dominated by men.

 

Hallmark

 

Specialising in tableware, such as spoons, sugar bowls, tea-caddies and salvers, she possessed exceptional skill and taste. Working with graceful, refined shapes, she created intricate pierced decoration and embellished pieces with bright cut engraved and bead ornamentation creating simple yet elegant patterns.

 

The family business continued long after her death and The Bateman legacy lives on today in the collections of antique collectors, enthusiasts and in museums. Hester's exquisite pieces continue to awe even the most avid collector. Her attention to detail, simplicity of form, and timeless taste make Hester Bateman truly the Queen of the Georgian Silversmiths.

 

SILVER SALVER
Hester Bateman, London 1803
GEORGE III SILVER SALVER AND TWO MATCHING WAITERS
Hester Bateman, London 1784
Largest 36cm diameter (c. 54oz)